Croatia Anti Corruption Institutional Framework

Corruption Perception Index
by Transparency International:
49/100 (2016)
Government Effectiveness (from -2,5 to +2,5),
World Governance Indicators by World Bank:
+0,51 (2015)
Control of Corruption (from -2,5 to +2,5),
World Governance Indicators by World Bank:
+0,20 (2015)
Index of Economic Freedom
by Heritage Foundation:
59.4/100 (2017)
Corruption (1=best, 7=worst),
Nations in Transit by Freedom House:
4.25 (2017)
Democracy Score (1=best, 7=worst),
Nations in Transit by Freedom House:
3.71 (2017)

Croatia has made considerable efforts to improve the anti-corruption framework, although implementation has still to demonstrate sustainable results. In the field of law enforcement Croatia has centralized the fight against corruption under one organization, the Office for the Suppression of Corruption and Organized Crime, with a broad political mandate to investigate, prosecute and prevent corruption based on its establishing legislation.

The competencies for investigating corruption in Croatia are shared by the Office for the Suppression of Corruption and Organized Crime (USKOK) and a specialized unit within the police, the National Police Office for Suppression of Corruption and Organized Crime (PNUSKOK). The two law enforcement bodies are well equipped to carry out effective investigations, and have developed a good track record of investigations into allegations of high-level corruption. The Office for the Suppression of Corruption and Organized Crime enjoys a broad mandate to investigate, prosecute and prevent corruption and organized crime. It is also responsible for international cooperation and exchange of information in complex investigations. USKOK’s focus is on middle and high-level corruption cases, with petty corruption cases being investigated and prosecuted by regular prosecutors.

Other anti-corruption bodies include the Anti-Money Laundering Department; the State Audit Office; the Tax Administration and the Customs Department within the Ministry of Finance; Office for Public Procurements; the Commission for Prevention of Conflict of Interest in Performing Public Duties; and the Independent Anti-Corruption Sector in the Ministry of Justice.

The National Council for Monitoring the Anti-Corruption Strategy is a special parliamentary committee with the purpose of coordinating the implementation of the Anti-Corruption Strategy and Action Plan. It is charged with evaluating corruption risks and proposing and designing preventative measures. Special court departments were established in four county courts. These courts have subject matter and territorial jurisdiction of criminal cases under USKOK’s competence. These special courts only deal with middle and high-level corruption and organized crime related cases.